Maison Alex Gambal

France Burgundy | www.alexgambal.com

“Alex Gambal went from trading in Washington, D.C., real estate to trading in Burgundy wine by way of stints working with broker Becky Wasserman and studying at the Lycée Viticole in Beaune at the improbably age of 39. It has been almost a decade now since Gambal began his négociant business. With a sophisticated, huge, gravity-fed, historic facility in the center of Beaune; increasingly high-quality grape contracts; and a gradual accumulation of his own vine acreage […] Gambal is demonstrating impressive results.” – Robert Parker on Maison Alex Gambal, “Parker’s Wine Buyers Guide, 7th Edition”, 2008

Owing to his passion for Burgundy, Alex Gambal escaped the world of real estate to explore this fascinating region in all its complexity. After attending viticultural school in Beaune, he established Maison Alex Gambal in 1997 with the goal of creating hand-crafted wines in the old-world fashion, each expressing character, terroir and purity. In 2011 he acquired vines in the Grand Cru Vineyard Bâtard-Montrachet, becoming the first non-Frenchman in history to purchase vines in this storied area. Maison Alex Gambal now produces 60,000 bottles per year, which can be found on tables in twenty countries.

The winemaking is practical and grounded on centuries-old Burgundian traditions. The grapes are all hand-harvested and fermented by naturally-occurring yeasts. Whites are barrel-fermented, aged on their lees for 10-16 months and only racked once before bottling, lightly fined and unfiltered. The reds are hand-harvested; destemmed, but not crushed and cold-macerated for a week. Fermentation in steel is followed by malolactic fermentation in barrel and maturation for 10-16 months. The wines are not fined or filtered. Cellar processes are performed according to biodynamic phases of the moon and planets.

France Burgundy
Chardonnay

Alex Gambal Chassagne-Montrachet 2015 [6/cs]

The drought and heatwave that struck Burgundy in July, August, and September of 2015 resulted in a low yield of ripe fruit and wines...